First Week

After weeks (or is it months?) of complaining and waiting for some kind of sign, I was finally accepted as a volunteer nurse in a nearby hospital. Yes, a volunteer nurse. Meaning there’s no compensation whatsoever. You only gain experience, much like those in role-playing games.

I’m not complaining too much though, “working” in the hospital is the first time I actually used what I learned in school in real life. I mean, I studied Economics before just to end up in a call center job. Yes, let’s say that I used to earn a lot before; but this gives me a certain kind of happies I can’t explain.

I am assigned to the OB ward, which I hated before because I thought wards were boring. I was supposed to be assigned in the out-patient department, but another volunteer “had to be let go” because he was allegedly a jackass. Anyway, being assigned in the OB wards turned out to be a great thing because there, I can learn things at a very slow and steady pace, I can watch TV (although they turn to channel 7 even if they have cable), there are students who actually do my job (YEAH!), which leads me to have time to order a cheeseburger value meal every chance I get and eat.

Which leads me some of the pitfalls of my so-called job. I eat every chance I get which doubled the cup size my man-boobs within a week, I get home at the wee hours of the evening (often times stressed, which leads me to eat some more), and my messed-up body clock doesn’t allow me to sleep right away. Plus, the sexy nurses I used to see in movies and TV turned out to be the total opposite in real life.

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But even with these, I realized that “working” there gave me an all new respect for nurses and what they do. Especially nurses in the public hospitals. I’m not sure if this applies to other hospitals but these guys more often that not, are overworked, underpaid, and sometimes shoulders some hospital and patient expenses. Even with sh-t being dropped in their heads all the time, they still manage to do their jobs efficiently; taking care of sometimes ungrateful patients; and teaching the noob volunteer a thing or two about things he’s supposed to know already, and not complain about it.

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First Week

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